Catch Up

Its been almost a month since my last post and apologise as its been a bit of a hectic month with uni exams, a Young Farming Champions (YFC) workshop, work and now I’m on holidays until Saturday, so its given me some time to catch up on a few things.

When I wrote my last Animals Australia were about to launch their Coles bags campaign and were attempting to create a few twitter  storms around Live Export without success. The bags were pulled from sale three days into the campaign by Coles after they received continued  pressure from the National Farmers Federation, suppliers and farmers. While this was a achievement for those who were opposed to the campaign, Animals Australia went onto attack the National Farmers Federation as well as Australian farmers describing them as bullies who against improving animal welfare. Rumours have also been circulating that Animals Australia made a small fortune out of the failed campaign as their regular donors tripled their donations.

I find it ironic but unsurprising that Animals Australia would label farmers and the National Farmers Federation as bullies seems as they were the ones who brought the Live Export trade that to a stop overnight, cutting off the main source of income as well as the foundation of many rural communities. I believe it just shows how disconnected some people are for them to try and shame us for supporting our industry and trying to prevent them from funding another attack on Australian agriculture. Animals Australia also went on to claim that our opposition to their campaign meant that we were supporting battery hens and sow stalls, however its the bigger picture that we are opposed to. We did not want to see a major retailer supporting a group that actively works to undermine Australian farmers. While they claim that they want to improve animal welfare standards yet their actions and website seem to contradict that claim, for start they are a lobby group and do nothing to physically help any animals. The other issue is that they don’t say there’s some things here we don’t agree with you on so lets work together to improve this, instead they just say we don’t like this lets ban it. We believe that this is not productive and will only provide people from non agricultural background with the wrong information about farming practices.

So to anyone who may be supporter of Animals Australia or those who just want to help out and contribute to welfare of livestock and the farmers who care for them, then I would suggest that you get on board with Aussie Helper “Buy A Bale” campaign. Go to www.buyabale.com.au where you can donate money towards the purchase of feed, diesel as well as gift cards to help make the lives of those doing it tough a bit more bearable.

Anyway in other news the picker went into the last of the dry land cotton this week, the crop had been starved of rain early in the season but really caught up late in the season, very late as it turned out but its still a great looking dry land crop. Hopefully I’ll have written another post by next week on the first YFC workshop.

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Up’s and Down’s

Its been a up and down week for Australian agriculture in media, with #supportliveex trending on twitter for almost twenty four hours while Animals Australia #LiveExShame tag failing to get a mention being the up for the week. Unfortunately Animals Australia also announced this week that Coles will be selling their “Make It Possible” bags, leaving Australian farmers frustrated at Coles to say the least.

On Wednesday night a couple of ladies on twitter found out that the keyboard warriors at Animals Australia were planning a twitter storm with the tag #LiveExShame, they quicklydecided that two can play at that game and launched their own twitter campaign with the tag #supportliveex; within seconds my twitter feed was soon full of tweets from people showing their support for live export and the farmers that depend on it. With such a great response it came as no surprise that #supportliveex was soon trending on twitter reaching number three on the list, unfortunately we were not able to remove bieber from the top of the list but at the same time #LiveExShame hadn’t made a appearance. By this stage it was getting late so I went to bed with the assumption that it would be all over by the morning, however the next morning it was still trending and continued to trend throughout the day and into the evening. The sheer length of time that #supportliveex was trending just goes to show how many people support Australian farmers and how they will not be swayed by the campaigns of groups like Animals Australia.

Twitter Trends

Animals Australia and Coles have announced that as of the 3rd of June Coles will be stocking Animals Australia’s “Make It Possible” grocery bags, leaving farmers and supporters of Australian agriculture frustrated with grocery giant to say the least. It is widely viewed that the funds generated from the sale of these bags will only go back into campaigns against Australian farmers instead of being used to make a real difference to a worthy cause such as helping drought affected farmers and their livestock. These views are well founded as only a quick glance at their website will show you their many campaigns against Australian agriculture and their relentless push for a vegan Australia.

The biggest concern about Animals Australia is that it is a lobby group and a very effective one; it does not run any shelters, give drought assistance or provide either time or money to help improve the conditions of animals in need such as those in drought affected Queensland. Instead they aim to influence legislation and promote a vegan Australia and they are very good at what they do. Animals Australia in conjunction with Four Corners where able to shut down a entire industry overnight through the use of images that were simply designed to generate a emotional response. The industry still hasn’t fully recovered from this ban, leading to a domestic oversupply, reduced prices and a build up of cattle on Australian farms enhancing problems such as the current Queensland drought, meaning that the lack of foresight by Animals Australia has only created animal welfare and environmental problems.

Their campaign against live export is not their only flawed policy, they have many (to many for me to write about) including their support of the protection of feral animals; they believe that because humans brought them to Australia we are responsible for their welfare and attempts should only be made to remove them if it is proven that they are over populated and a non lethal control is used. Feral animals have a hugely negative effect on the environment, native animals and of course farmers, so trying to protect them would only be counter productive to other environmental works and attempts at regenerating native species.

Coles decision to work with Animals Australia will only work to worsen already frosty relations between farmers and the giant, hopefully they will soon realise the error of their way and cease the sale of these bags, I know I’ll be shopping at Woolies now. For more information on the problems that Animals Australia causes farmers read “Animals Australia – The Wolf Amongst the Sheep“. Please feel free to comment and leave your thoughts and opinions on either Coles and Animals Australia or the social media campaign on twitter.

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A sense of humour always helps